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Boise Weekly - Idaho's only alternative weekly newspaper. Boise's best source for news, arts and entertainment, classifieds and upcoming events.

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  • 04/23/18--07:21: April 23, 2018: What to Know
  • Welcoming a little prince, a spectacular spring forecast, A Quiet Place reclaims the box office crown, the Steelheads are still fighting, and no handshake, no citizenship, at least in France. Kate, the Duchess of Cambridge, gave birth to a boy early today. Kensington Palace shared the good news on Twitter, announcing that the baby weighs 8 pounds, 7 ounces and that "Her Royal Highness and her child are both doing well." The name of the baby has yet to be released. The National Weather Service Office in Boise is serving up a near-perfect forecast for the coming week, with sunshine-filled days and clear, cool evenings. Boise highs will be the 70s on Tuesday, April 24, and Wednesday, April 25, and temperatures will climb to 80 degrees on Thursday, April 26, and Friday, April 27. After completing all legal requirements, an Algerian woman was still refused French citizenship. Her problem? She refused to shake hands with male officials at a French naturalization ceremony. The New York Times reports that officials with the French Council of State said the woman's refusal "in a place and at a moment that are symbolic, reveals a lack of assimilation." The woman appealed the decision, but the court decreed that the initial decision was legal and binding. The last known person to have been born in the 19th Century died over the weekend. Time Magazine reports that 117-year-old Nabi Tajima died April 21 in the town of Kikai, Japan. She raised seven sons and two daughters and had more than 160 descendants, including great-great-great grandchildren. The Idaho Steelheads are still fighting to keep their post-season dreams alive. The Steelies beat the Allen Americans 2-1 last night in Allen, Texas. The two teams will head back to Boise for a sixth game in the best-of-seven series, in which the Americans are up 3-2. The puck will drop at CenturyLink Arena in Boise tomorrow night at 7 p.m. If necessary, a seventh game will be held in Boise on Wednesday, April 25. The nearly dialogue-free horror film A Quiet Place returned to the top of the North American box office this past weekend. Variety reports A Quiet Place has reaped total domestic earnings of $132 million. Rampage was in second place this past weekend, raking in $21 million, followed by the Amy Schumer comedy, I Feel Pretty which earned an underwhelming $16 million in its opening weekend. …

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    Both city officials and local groups will be celebrating Arbor Day on Friday, April 27. Considering Boise is nicknamed The City of Trees—a moniker derived from the root of the city's name, the French word bois or "wood"—it's no surprise that both city officials and local groups will be celebrating Arbor Day on Friday, April 27. If you're still stumped (pun intended) on how to spend your time on the holiday that revolves around planting and promoting trees, here are a few ideas close to home: Idaho State Arbor Day Celebration and Tree Planting At 10 a.m. on April 27, State Controller Brandon D. Woolf will preside over the ceremonial planting of a Kwanzan cherry tree in Capitol Park. The winners of the Idaho Forest Product Commission's student photo contest (grades 5-12) in honor of Arbor Day will also pick up their cash prizes at the event, which is free and open to the public. Arbor Day Blue Spruce Seedlings Giveaway The Idaho Forest Product Commission, which manages both public and private forests in the Gem State, will also promote tree planting by giving away free 1-year-old Blue Spruce seedlings in Idaho, Washington and Oregon. The trees, provided by the University of Idaho, will be up for grabs while supplies last at the State Arbor Day Celebration, Home Depot, Mountain West Bank locations, Whole Foods and the Boise Co-op on Arbor Day. Check the IFPC website for details. Idaho Native Plant Society Annual Native Plant Sale The Arbor Day spirit doesn't have to end when the day itself is over. While the holiday is all about trees, it's also a reminder to show appreciation for the greater variety of plants nature provides, and there's nowhere better to do it than at the Idaho Native Plant Society plant sale. On Saturday, April 28, the day after Arbor Day, INPS will put hundreds of native plants up for sale at the Idaho Fish and Game MK Nature Center. Plus, the sale coincides with the center's Spring Wildlife Celebration from 10 a.m.-4 p.m., which includes activities for kids like making beaver dams and replicating animal tracks, live demonstrations and more for a $3 entry fee. All proceeds from the event and sale will go back to the center's educational programs, so with a nod to mother nature it's a win-win-win.  Happy planting!…

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    The Ada County Sheriff's Office is being assisted by deputies from the Canyon and Owyhee county sheriff's offices. The Ada County Sheriff's Office is still searching for a Boise man who fell out of a canoe and into the Snake River April 21. According to ACSO, the unidentified man had been canoeing with a woman when, about a mile and a half from Celebration Park, they encountered turbulence that caused their canoe to capsize. Neither were wearing life jackets, but the woman was able to grab one of the vests as she swam to shore. Witnesses said the man disappeared while attempting to swim to shore as well. The woman was treated for hypothermia, and the Ada County Trauma Intervention Team is providing support. ACSO rescue is being assisted by deputies from the Canyon and Owyhee county sheriff's offices. …

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  • 04/24/18--06:55: April 24, 2018: What to Know
  • Tragedy in Toronto, a bandshell blaze in Boise, a plastic bag ban proposal in New York and the geese are back on the blue turf at Boise State. The investigation continues into a horrific event in downtown Toronto, Canada. At least 10 people were killed and 15 others injured when a driver of a van mowed down pedestrians along Younge Street. The CBC reports that it appears that the driver, 25-year-old Alek Minassian, acted intentionally, but authorities have not yet classified the attack as an act of terrorism. The historic Gene Harris Bandshell suffered roof damage in an overnight fire in Boise's Julia Davis Park. The Boise Fire Department responded to the blaze just after 8:15 p.m. Monday. The structure, constructed in 1928, had smoke pouring from the roof and flames shooting from the front. No one was injured and the investigation into the cause is underway. New York Governor Andrew Cuomo has introduced a bill that would call for a statewide ban on single-use plastic bags. Cuomo says he wants to see the bags outlawed by this time next year. The New York Times reports that if the bill becomes law, New York would join California, which began its own statewide ban of plastic bags in 2016. According to the Independent, France has instituted new rules to ban vegetarian food from being labeled with terms usually reserved for meat. For example, you won't be seeing a veggie burger on a French menu. Yes, there will be patties made with beans or fake meat, but henceforth, there won't be any co-mingling of identities. The same goes for dairy products. Unless it's actually made with milk from a farm animal, it can't be called milk. The sports news website SB Nation has a report on something that most Boiseans already know: geese are constantly fooled by the blue turf at Albertson's Stadium, confusing it with a body of water. There are plenty of Canada geese around the stadium, not just because the turf is blue, but because of the stadium's proximity to the Boise River. …

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  • 04/25/18--03:00: Letters from Anne and Martin
  • Two New York-based performers will take the stage at the Morrison Center to present excerpts of Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl and "Letter from a Birmingham Jail" Though they lived radically different lives, human rights legends Anne Frank and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. had something vital in common, apart from sharing the same period in history: both were advocates with powerful voices. In the upcoming Wassmuth Center for Human Rights production Letters from Anne and Martin, two New York-based performers will take the stage at the Morrison Center to present excerpts of Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl and "Letter from a Birmingham Jail" in character as Frank (Alexandra Gellner) and King (Wesli Spencer). Following the reading, local jazz musician Steve Eaton will perform a set continuing the night's themes of activism and inspiration, including a compilation of "We Will Always Stand as One." Pick up tickets to hear directly from two 20th-century greats.

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  • 04/25/18--03:00: National Pretzel Day
  • Acme Bakeshop and Payette Brewing are joining forces to bring a National Pretzel Day celebration to the City of Trees. According to the National Day Calendar, National Pretzel Day—celebrated annually on April 26—was announced in 2003 by Pennsylvania Governor Ed Rendell; a fitting herald, considering The New York Times reported in the late 1980s that Philadelphians gobble up an estimated 300,000 soft pretzels every day. Eleven years after Rendell's announcement, Acme Bakeshop and Payette Brewing are joining forces to bring a National Pretzel Day celebration to the City of Trees. The event will feature $2 Acme pretzels and $3 20-ounce Payette lagers. Serious pretzel lovers can even pay $3 to create a "pretzel festival necklace" with help from Acme from 5-8 p.m. If you think nothing goes together better than salty snacks and suds, Payette Brewing is the place to be Thursday night.

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  • 04/25/18--03:00: The Majority of the Minority
  • Just try to avoid the upcoming Idaho primary. We double-dare you. Just try to avoid the upcoming Idaho primary. We double-dare you. Turn on any television or radio or check your Facebook feed, and you'll see a robust, often-heated contest for Idaho's next governor. Additionally, the money being spent by many of the Democratic and Republican candidates is off the charts. "This may end up being the most expensive election in Idaho history," Ada County Chief Deputy Clerk Phil McGrane told us. Yet, we're told not to expect a significant voter turnout on Tuesday, May 15. Most pundits aren't expecting much more than 25 percent of registered voters to show at the polls. We dive into this puzzlement on pages 6 and 7. Meanwhile, it's down to the wire for the grass-roots effort to put the issue of Idaho's Medicaid gap—the tens of thousands of Gem State citizens without coverage—on the November ballot. Medicaid for Idaho needs to collect 56,192 signatures by Monday, April 30, and we check on their progress on page 8. We also introduce you to 81-year-old Gene Nora Jessen of Meridian, one of the women recruited to undergo secret testing in the 1960s in an attempt to prove eligible for the Mercury space program. Idaho Public Television's Marcia Franklin introduces Jessen, who calls herself an "astro-not," on page 9. Plus, Ben Schultz visits with Idaho-based rock group Wide Stance on page 14—yes, their name is a tribute, of sorts, to the controversy that dogged U.S. Sen. Larry Craig—and Brian Millar takes us to Boise Art Museum's Art of Fashion Show on page 16. Designers and artists created some pretty spectacular wardrobe pieces made of metal, paper, clay and more. On page 17, I preview the new film Lean on Pete, opening Friday, April 27, at The Flicks. Finally, we were a bit stunned to hear that there won't be a Deli Days this summer. Greta Gardner reports on page 18 that volunteers at Congregation Ahavath Beth Israel have been overwhelmed with the festival's popularity, resulting in a pause. Oh, and one more thing—there are only five days left to vote in our Best of Boise polls, so head to boiseweekly.com to make your voice heard before Monday, April 30.…

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    Now in its eighth year, the film festival continues to aim to "challenge assumptions and break down stereotypes" by showing a series of short films that focus on people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. If the word sprout conjures up the image of a valiant flower shoot pushing up through a crack in the sidewalk, then you've got a pretty good idea of what the The Arc's annual Sprout Film Festival is all about. Now in its eighth year, the film festival continues to aim to "challenge assumptions and break down stereotypes" by showing a series of short films that focus on people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The event is twofold, including a special morning screening for kids and an evening screening at The Egyptian Theatre open to the public for a small admission fee. Inclusivity, empowerment and acceptance are all major themes of the event, which puts those who are often shunted out of the spotlight center stage. Grab a seat Friday, April 27, to get inspired.

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  • 04/25/18--03:00: "Booga. Booga"

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  • 04/25/18--03:00: Indie Bookstore Day
  • In Boise, Rediscovered Books will put itself front and center by throwing a bash Saturday, April 28, for Indie Bookstore Day, the national holiday that celebrates local book stores. Independent bookstores are magical places, where you're likely to run into a local author giving a talk one day and find snacks from a nearby restaurant the next, alongside perennial shelves of beckoning reads. In Boise, Rediscovered Books will put itself front and center by throwing a bash Saturday, April 28, for Indie Bookstore Day, the national holiday that celebrates local book stores and their roles in the cities they call home. At Rediscovered, Indie Bookstore Day means a packed calendar, including Book Bingo 10 a.m.-3 p.m., a visit from local children's book author Leslie Patricelli 11 a.m.-1 p.m. and an award presentation for Idaho author Emily Ruskovich at noon. Plus, Rediscovered will offer free audio books all day through the online shop Libro.fm. Don't miss this chance to support the store you love.

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  • 04/25/18--03:00: FRENSHIP
  • Even without the guidance of its eclectic, evocative videos, FRENSHIP's music has a sun-soaked aesthetic and free-love vibe. The LA-based electro-pop duo FRENSHIP is a two-man band, but its music—fittingly, considering its name—is the perfect soundtrack for adventure with a large group of friends. Fresh off a 2017 tour with Bastille, FRENSHIP has struck out on its own to promote its newest singles "Love Somebody" and "Goodmorning, Goodbye." Though it has yet to release a full album, the duo has found a dedicated following on streaming platforms like Spotify, which named it the #2 Breakout Artist of 2016, and music apps like Shazam, which crowned it a 2017 Emerging Artist. Even without the guidance of its eclectic, evocative videos, FRENSHIP's music has a sun-soaked aesthetic and free-love vibe. In tracks like "1000 Nights" and "Love Somebody," drum beats mimic footsteps, and the doubled refrains conjure up the image of dozens of people raising their voices. Even songs that are tinged with desperation, like the platinum- and gold-certified Emily Warren collaboration "Capsize," are undeniably danceable. Catch FRENSHIP at Neurolux for a dose of Tuesday positivity.

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    The Teal Chair was greeted with generous audience approval at the Sun Valley Film Festival One of the highlights of the 2018 Sun Valley Film Festival didn't feature a red carpet, high-wattage glamor or Oscar-winning talent. It was a ten-minute film, The Teal Chair, crafted by five teens. The quintet, all Eagle High School Students, teamed with Treasure Valley Hospice to pose the question, "What would you do if you learned that you were dying soon?'" What followed were heartbreaking, insightful and occasionally hilarious answers from teenagers, caregivers, cancer survivors and even a 102-year-old Nampa woman. Making the film more intriguing was the filmmakers' use of a large, cushy teal armchair, which each respondent sat in to contemplate what they might do if they didn't have long to live. Over the course of the film, the teal chair popped up in some intriguing places: in the middle of downtown Boise, on the peaks of the Foothills and even at JUMP. The Teal Chair was greeted with generous audience approval in Sun Valley. Since its debut, the film has been lengthened to 30 minutes, and on Thursday, April 26, the expanded production will have its first full public presentation, quite appropriately, at JUMP. In another bit of serendipity, the now-famous teal chair itself will appear for filmmakers to sit in while they chat about their experience. Tickets cost $10, and a portion of the proceeds will help fund Wish Granters Inc., a nonprofit that grants wishes to adults with terminal illnesses.…

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    This year, an infusion of works from the private collection of R. Grey Gallery co-owner Barbara Kaylor has more than doubled the art and jewelry pieces up for grabs. R. Grey Gallery on Eighth Street in Boise has hosted the Boise State University Art Metals Silent Auction for the past 15 years. Typically, the auction includes a spread of 15 to 20 art objects and jewelry pieces made by BSU Art Metals Professor Anika Smulovitz's students, plus occasional alumni works, but over the years the number of both students and pieces has dwindled. This year's auction is the exception: an infusion of works from the private collection of gallery co-owner Barbara Kaylor has more than doubled the pieces up for grabs. "Every year, I've purchased one or more pieces ... So, I had quite a big collection and I thought, 'Well, I'm going to donate those back and see if we can get some more money to give back to the university,'" said Kaylor. The pieces on display are mostly silver, copper, bronze and brass, but introduce other materials too, like wood, glass, felt and even fur. Kaylor's favorite piece up for resale is a brooch made by past BSU student Ellen Crosby, which she purchased at the 2007 auction. "When it's closed it looks like shutters from a window. And you open it up, and there's a photo in there of a person," Kaylor said, describing the piece titled "Watching You." According to Smulovitz, the students have a lot of free reign over the works they create, although she presents them with different challenges each year. Sometimes, there's a theme for the auction. In other years, students pass pieces back and forth round-robin style, each working on them for 45 minutes. This year, two students worked with each piece. "It's a very different way of working and problem solving, usually you have a lot more control. So that's kind of a fun way to get them to loosen up and think in a different way," said Smulovitz. Though the auction may seem like a small fundraiser from the outside, it's a vital source of income for the Art Metals program. "Usually we raise about a third of our working income for the year," said Smulovitz. "The other two-thirds are raised with student fees." The auction generally nets between $700 and $1,200 to pay for supplies and visiting artists, but both Kaylor and Smulovitz have their fingers crossed for a bumper year. Bidding on 31 works (13 from students, 18 from Kaylor) is ongoing at the gallery through…

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    You Know the Place"explores the Idaho stores, shops, clubs, and pubs you always pass by, but never seem to visit." If you're the type of person that listens to talk radio rather than an all-music station and reads a local newspaper (thanks, by the way) there's a good chance you also listen to podcasts, the episodic digital audio files that have exploded in popularity in the last decade. In Boise, the NPR affiliate Boise State Public Radio is home to a good number of podcasts-turned-show-segments (and vice versa), including Hidden Brain and How I Built This, and while many of them cater to national audiences, a recent addition, You Know the Place, is specific to Boise. Hosted by Lacey Daley and Joel Wayne, You Know the Place "explores the Idaho stores, shops, clubs, and pubs you always pass by, but never seem to visit" in bi-monthly episodes, answering the question of how they stay afloat—in short, it's the perfect podcast for the curious. Each episode is roughly 30 minutes long, and so far investigations into Boise's Rockin' Reptile, India Fashion & Grocery and The Beardsmith are available for free. Check the Boise State Public Radio website to kick off your next knowledge binge.

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  • 04/25/18--03:00: "At The Core"
  • Medium: Encaustic and mixed media Artist Statement: My newest work is currently on display at the Trueblood Gallery at Boise State University until Sunday, May 27. This current exhibit, The Nature of Spirit, is a collaboration with Shelley Jund and explores the intersections between art, science and spirit.…

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  • 04/25/18--03:01: Gene Nora Jessen
  • "My feeling was, 'Boy isn’t this fun? What a challenge. And what an adventure to get a little finger in the pie and find out what this is all about.'" The recent emergency landing of a Southwest Airlines plane by Captain Tammie Jo Shults has drawn attention once again to female airline pilots, who only make up 4.4% of the force in the U.S. Shults, 56, was also one of the first fighter jet pilots in the U.S. Navy. Only about a decade before she joined the Navy in 1985, though, she wouldn’t have been able to fly for the military at all, and female military pilots couldn’t serve in combat until 1993. NASA in the 1960s and 70s was similarly closed to female astronauts, because they had to be military test pilots. But in 1960, Dr. William Randolph Lovelace II, a member of a NASA committee, had a hunch that female pilots could pass the same tests given the male candidates for the Mercury 7 program. He was correct, and 13 women passed his privately-funded, secret tests. The last round of testing was halted by NASA and then-Vice President Lyndon Johnson, though. It was just too controversial. The women went on to other careers, many in aviation. Over the years, their story came out, and they were dubbed the “Mercury 13.” Their experiences have been chronicled in books and on television, and now again in a new Netflix documentary, Mercury 13, which premiered on Friday, April 20. Meridian resident Gene Nora Jessen, 81, one of the original Mercury 13, has a featured role in the film, which includes scenes filmed at the Tower Grill at the Nampa Municipal Airport. Jessen, who came to Idaho with her husband Bill in 1967, is an accomplished pilot, air racer and flight instructor, as well as the co-owner of Boise Air Service from 1984-2005. She’s also the author of three books. Idaho Public Television producer and host Marcia Franklin caught up with Jessen to ask her about the documentary and to get her thoughts on being an “astro-not,” as Jessen dubs herself.Ultimately, she’s rather nonchalant about the experience. “We didn’t do anything,” she told Franklin. “We just took a little physical exam and it was kind of an adventure. But they do say that we’re the pioneers in this, so I guess we’ll accept that.” What did you think of the documentary? I was pleased with it. Sometimes I sign my letters, “Yours for accurate history.” And that’s very important for me, that it was accurate. They told the story the way it…

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